Hi name's Emmanuel I'm 21 and in college but whatever *flips hair, does a kickflip on a magical skateboard*. I create characters that I want to make for video games and comic books and I design my own tattoos (unprofessionally), none of which I post often or steadily enough, because I am the laziest sack of shit to ever exist. Please follow me, I'll love you forever if you do. *DISCLAIMER* Blog may contain milk, eggs, Homestuck, nuts, and me just being a huge nerd probably ok bye.

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oscob:

caexemptdeath:

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The Unique minds of Tumblr

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Source: phunderplonics

vinebox:

The leading cause of deaths of white males are stupid pranks gone wrong

Source: vinebox

contramundane:

mamanoooo:

noiselesspatientspider:

peaceful-moon:

laughing-trees:


In this African tribe, when someone does something harmful, they take the person to the center of the village where the whole tribe comes and surrounds them.  For two days, they will say to the man all the good things that he has done. The tribe believes that each human being comes into the world as a good. Each one of us only desiring safety, love, peace and happiness.  But sometimes, in the pursuit of these things, people make mistakes. The community sees those mistakes as a cry for help. They unite then to lift him, to reconnect him with his true nature, to remind him who he really is, until he fully remembers the truth of which he had been temporarily disconnected: “I am good.” Shikoba Nabajyotisaikia! NABAJYOTISAIKIA, is a compliment used in South Africa and means: “I respect you, I cherish you. You matter to me.” In response, people say SHIKOBA, which is: “So, I exist for you.”

:’))))))

WHY ISN’T THIS A THING IN ALL CULTURES

some day I’m going to create a bingo card for these kinds of posts.
vague mention of “Africa” and “African tribe” with no actual names of tribes, countries, or languages, because Africa is a country and everyone there is exactly the same obv: check.
picture of smiling/emotional black people taken completely out of context: check.
made-up “African” words with deep meanings: check.
"noble savage" grossness out the wazoo: check.
this photo is a picture of Ghanaian boys playing soccer from Amen: Grassroots Football.
Initial googling says that Shikoba means “feather” in Choctaw, which would mean OP isn’t even on the right damn continent.
(When I look at Choctaw-English dictionaries, though, shikoba doesn’t show up at all; the word for feather seems to be “híshi.” “Shikobli” is a verb meaning “to put on a plume” so maybe there’s some conjugation or gerund going on here? I’d welcome any corrections from actual Choctaw speakers.)
Nabajyoti Saikia is someone’s name. OP just straight-up stole some poor Indian cement chemist’s name for their colonialist hippie bullshit.
Look at this dude. He didn’t spend years of his life writing a goddamn textbook on waste management strategies so that you could use his name to prop up this crock of shit. He’s disappointed in you. Do better.



Oh. My. Goodness. You. Have. To. Be. Kidding. Me. I probably reblogged this a while ago too without even knowing :/

I was just going to say “In WHAT African tribe?”And why the fuck y’all still calling countries “tribes”? Ugh.

contramundane:

mamanoooo:

noiselesspatientspider:

peaceful-moon:

laughing-trees:

In this African tribe, when someone does something harmful, they take the person to the center of the village where the whole tribe comes and surrounds them.

For two days, they will say to the man all the good things that he has done.

The tribe believes that each human being comes into the world as a good. Each one of us only desiring safety, love, peace and happiness.

But sometimes, in the pursuit of these things, people make mistakes.

The community sees those mistakes as a cry for help.

They unite then to lift him, to reconnect him with his true nature, to remind him who he really is, until he fully remembers the truth of which he had been temporarily disconnected: “I am good.”

Shikoba Nabajyotisaikia!

NABAJYOTISAIKIA, is a compliment used in South Africa and means: “I respect you, I cherish you. You matter to me.” In response, people say SHIKOBA, which is: “So, I exist for you.”

:’))))))

WHY ISN’T THIS A THING IN ALL CULTURES

some day I’m going to create a bingo card for these kinds of posts.

  • vague mention of “Africa” and “African tribe” with no actual names of tribes, countries, or languages, because Africa is a country and everyone there is exactly the same obv: check.
  • picture of smiling/emotional black people taken completely out of context: check.
  • made-up “African” words with deep meanings: check.
  • "noble savage" grossness out the wazoo: check.

this photo is a picture of Ghanaian boys playing soccer from Amen: Grassroots Football.

Initial googling says that Shikoba means “feather” in Choctaw, which would mean OP isn’t even on the right damn continent.

(When I look at Choctaw-English dictionaries, though, shikoba doesn’t show up at all; the word for feather seems to be “híshi.” “Shikobli” is a verb meaning “to put on a plume” so maybe there’s some conjugation or gerund going on here? I’d welcome any corrections from actual Choctaw speakers.)

Nabajyoti Saikia is someone’s name. OP just straight-up stole some poor Indian cement chemist’s name for their colonialist hippie bullshit.

Look at this dude. He didn’t spend years of his life writing a goddamn textbook on waste management strategies so that you could use his name to prop up this crock of shit. He’s disappointed in you. Do better.

Oh. My. Goodness. You. Have. To. Be. Kidding. Me. I probably reblogged this a while ago too without even knowing :/

I was just going to say “In WHAT African tribe?”

And why the fuck y’all still calling countries “tribes”? Ugh.

(via crash--bandicooch)

Source: enigmatic-being

(via dekutree)

Source: mootscicle

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

(via crash--bandicooch)

Source: plainpictures

supersoldiers:

(via crash--bandicooch)

Source: leanaisnotabanana

rufiozuko:

Check it out, friend! :D

thank you! i had this conversation with dozens of people all over the world! i pronounce it “gif” but that’s just me.

Source: rufiozuko

tinycartridge:

Pokemon Ruby/Sapphire and Alpha/Omega compared ⊟
I love seeing how Game Freak updates its 2D worlds into 3D scenes for its remakes, adding so much more detail and flair without losing the design of the original. Props to @RogersBase for the comparison shots!
PREORDER Pokemon Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire, upcoming games

tinycartridge:

Pokemon Ruby/Sapphire and Alpha/Omega compared ⊟

I love seeing how Game Freak updates its 2D worlds into 3D scenes for its remakes, adding so much more detail and flair without losing the design of the original. Props to @RogersBase for the comparison shots!

PREORDER Pokemon Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire, upcoming games
Source: tinycartridge

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a-child-at-heart-x:

fuckyeah-roxas:

It’s been 12 years and i’m still not able to summon a keyblade. Wtf is this shit.

Must be in the snap of the wrist or something.

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Source: fuckyeah-roxas